Nasty Women: A Collection of Essays + Accounts on What It is to be a Woman in the 21st Century

Nasty Women: A Collection of Essays + Accounts on What It is to be a Woman in the 21st Century by indie publisher 404Ink took the Internet by storm some months ago. The book contains essays by women writers on their lived experience as women in the 21st century. The project caught the attention of feminist all over Twitter, and it was even backed up by Margaret Atwood herself:

‘An essential window into many of the hazard-strewn worlds younger women are living in right now.’ – Margaret Atwood (Twitter

I first encountered Nasty Women through their Kickstarter campaign in which 404Ink aimed to get the book published, paid the 20 authors they had commissioned texts from, and spread their nastiness all over the world. The campaign went viral and it raised £ 22.156, an amount which greatly exceeds the funding proposed by the publishers by a 369%. In an attempt to make my next visit to the UK more interesting I had hoped to buy a book at a local library when I saw they had review copies, and they were being sent to bloggers, and yes, 404Ink would be generous enough to send me one. I could not believe my luck.

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The book covers the complex, and sometimes heart-breaking experience of being a woman in the times of Brexit, Trump, and an economic crisis that has left little time and space for any other issues than money. All the authors make an effort to situate their experience, that is, they acknowledge their race, social class, ethnicity, nationality, family history, gender identity, sexual orientation and even tastes make them who they are. Hence, their stories come from them and do not aim to speak for any collective, they are a subjective approach to a given issue. All of them are survivals of the political experience of identifying as a woman in a patriarchal society, but they choose what to talk about, and why. Some of them self-identify as victims, some others not, but they all have something in common: A desire to keep fighting. Among my favourite topics were social class, the importance of imperfect role models for young women (both famous and familiar!), and the struggle of losing a beloved one and become the next tangible generation.

It is difficult to review Nasty Women as a single work due to the wide range of voices that it contains. The experiences of these women come from other countries and even other times. They have travelled the world, and they have chosen to share their experiences with an audience that is hungry to know more, to learn more and to connect. The book achieves that, but for English-speakers only, as all the women have written their own pieces and they all come from English-speaking countries. However, this tiny blind spot does not take away from the collection as no work is perfect. In fact, the collection covers some silenced issues such as fashion for disabled people, culture from in a working-class environment, and the recovery of traditional female knowledge once deemed ‘witchery’.

Nasty Women is a collection of essays that will open readers’ minds to the complexity of being female and making the political decision to identify as such in a patriarchal society. But above all, Nasty Women will connect the women who wrote it, publish it, and read it. Turning the last page feels like saying goodbye to that group of female friends who you only meet once in a while, but who make life better. And in order to keep them heard and heard, it is necessary to remember their names (in alphabetical order): Alice Tarbuck, Anna Cosgrave, Becca Inglis, Chitra Ramaswamy, Christina Neuwirth, Claire Heuchan, Elise Hines, Jen McGregor, Joelle Owusu, Jona Kottler, Kaite Welsh, Katie Muriel, Laura Jane Grace of Against Me! (in conversation with Sasha de Buyl-Pisco), Laura Lam, Laura Waddell, Mel Reeve, Nadine Aisha Jassat, Ren Aldridge of Petrol Girls, Rowan C. Clarke, Sim Bajwa, and Zeba Talkhani. And these are their faces:

[L-R] Anna Cosgrave, Nadine Aisha Jassat, Sim Bajwa, Aiice Tarbuck, Becca Inglis, Chitra Ramaswamy, Christina Neuwirth, Claire Heuchan

[L-R] Anna Cosgrave, Nadine Aisha Jassat, Sim Bajwa, Aiice Tarbuck, Becca Inglis, Chitra Ramaswamy, Christina Neuwirth, Claire Heuchan. From 404Ink.

[L-R] Jen McGregor, Joelle Owusu, Jona Kottler, Kaite Welsh, Katie Muriel, Laura Waddell, Mel Reeve, Zeba Talkhani

[L-R] Jen McGregor, Joelle Owusu, Jona Kottler, Kaite Welsh, Katie Muriel, Laura Waddell, Mel Reeve, Zeba Talkhani. From 404Ink.

Nasty women is set to become THE non-fiction book of 2017 thanks to the complexity of every essay, and the importance of the topics covered in a time when being other than a white, middle-class, Western, abled, cisgender man has become a political act of rebellion against the status quo.

Nasty Women is published by 404 Ink on International Women’s Day, 8th March 2017. You can pre-order your copy directly from the publisher here.

Thanks to Heather McAid and Laura Jones for the collection, the review copy, and the many conversations on Twitter. #NastyWomen.

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6 thoughts on “Nasty Women: A Collection of Essays + Accounts on What It is to be a Woman in the 21st Century

  1. Claire 'Word by Word' says:

    Timely indeed and a great initiative to get this published through a kickstart campaign. Perhaps there will be a second edition with the perspectives of women from non English speaking parts of the world, there are so many possibilities of variations on a theme, this one had to suceed first I guess.

    Like

  2. whatthelog says:

    I can’t wait to read this!! I think it says a lot that the kickstarter did so well – we need more books like this, and I’m so proud to have helped out. Great review 😀

    Like

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